Menu Monday: Valentine’s Steak & Potato Alternative

Who doesn’t love a good excuse to enjoy a nice meal from time to time? Personally, I cannot think of a better excuse than Valentine’s Day!

 

I myself am a vegetarian, but I cannot help but think of a nice meal like steak and potatoes for this special occasion. So, in true health-conscious fashion, I want to encourage you to adopt a healthy alternative to this traditional meal WITHOUT compromising taste. Instead, how about trying steak and cauliflower mash?

 

Why cauliflower over potatoes?

For those of you wanting to cut calories and needing to watch carbs, a cauliflower mash is the perfect alternative to mashed potatoes. Cauliflower is lower in calories and carbohydrates, as well as higher in fiber. According to this Skinny Cauliflower Mock Mashed Potatoes recipe, a serving size is 119 calories and 13.4 grams of carbs, compared to buttery mashed potatoes which contain 240 calories and 35 grams of carbs. So before you knock it, just give it a try! After all, you might actually like it.

 

Now, for the steak…

As a vegetarian, I always tend to choose a bean, lentil or jackfruit meat-like substitute. Frankly though, there is simply nothing that compares to the taste of a steak. So if you are not open to subbing your steak with a plant-based alternative or leaner piece of meat like fish or chicken,  then I believe it is critical to understand how to make the right choices when consuming beef.

 

Here’s what you need to know in order to healthily eat your Valentine’s Day steak.

  • Nutrition guidelines recommend a portion size of meat to be about the size of your palm or a deck of cards. This typically equates to 3-4 ounces of cooked meat, however, many restaurants tend to serve 6 ounces or greater.
  • When cooking steak, use a cooking grate or something similar to allow the excess fat the ability to drain away from the piece of meat.
  • After cooking the steak, try to rid the excess fat by trimming it off.
  • Processed and red meat has been associated with high-saturated fat content as well as greater potential for cancer causing agents. For this reason, beef should be considered a treat and consumed only in moderation, even when choosing lean cuts.
  • According to the Mayo Clinic, cuts of meat that qualify and meet USDA regulations for lean or extra lean meats are:
    • Eye of round roast and steak
    • Sirloin tip side steak
    • Top round roast and steak
    • Bottom round roast and steak
    • Top sirloin steak 

 

 


 

Do you wish to learn more about age consumption of beef, poultry and other meat? Read more here  and click HERE to learn more about the Wellview services available to you. We can’t wait to work with you!

 

– CASEY EDMONDS, CHC

Health Advisor  |  

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